5 Tips for Emails that Get Opened and Convert

By | October 2, 2015

Email marketing is a bit of an odd duck: As other marketing channels
have seen a distinct rise and fall in the face of social media and new
communications technologies, email marketing still remains effective.
In fact, despite all of our new ways to communicate, people still retain
the use of their email for daily use. Receiving invoices, communicating
with customers, etc.; sure, other platforms have sprung up for these
communications, but none are as ubiquitous as email. That said, email
marketing has aged, and therefore it has changed. Getting your emails
opened, then read, then obeyed, is no easy task. It was hard in the
beginning, and it’s super hard now that everyone and their mother is
used to receiving promotional emails. Let’s take a look at how your
emails can be the exception to the rule in a “no open” world.

Give before you take: Many marketers have gotten a lot smarter about
this now, but it wasn’t always the case, and there are still many who
fall flat on their face when balancing their value. Think about the
reasons you follow the accounts you do on twitter. Think about which
emails you open when they slide into your inbox. They’re the ones that
are important to you, not the ones that sell and annoy you the most.
Your customers are just like you, so make sure you’re building trust and
value through emails that really offer something, before you every ask
for any action(s) in return.

Avoid subject line cliches: This is the most controversial piece of
advice here. Most people these days are used to the types of subject
line formulas that have traditionally performed well, and haven’t
realized that their effectiveness is dying down. Consider simply
summarizing your subject lines in a way that makes them sound like
they’re from a genuine person. Companies now more than ever perform
better when viewed as individuals or collectives of individuals rather
than businesses.

Keep it short: How many of you have received emails from some marketer
whose email list you opted which are pages long? How many of you read
them to the end? How many of you send these types of emails yourself?
If you want an email to be a sales letter, keep it short, visual, and
enticing, then use a CTA to get people to click out of an email and onto
one of your pages where you have more control. People are turned off
when they expect a helpful message and are greeted with a 9 paragraph
sales letter in email form.

Get feedback: One really can’t stress enough how valuable it is to hear
back from your customers directly about how you’re doing and how they
interact with your brand or your product. The assumptions you make may
not be helping you at all, so it’s important that you reach out and
invite feedback; you may just find that a slight tweak to your sales
funnel could address something that is currently a huge conversion
killer for your customers. This could take the form of either a
personal email message or a survey.

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